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Rome Studio — Summer 2015 — Information Coming Soon

The Rome Studio — Summer 2015 is in it’s initial planning stages.  Please check back here for updates.  Initial tentative program dates:  May 21 — June 18, 2015.

FULL PROGRAM DETAILS will become available under the “Program Information” page above.

The following video contains relevant information about the Rome Studio, with an introduction by Professor Vincent Caranchini, the Program Director, and student interviews. Ignore the dates contained in the video.  For upcoming program and application dates check back to this blog, or the Education Abroad Office: https://www.ohio.edu/educationabroad/Programs/rome.html

The following posts, in reverse chronological order, are daily reports on the activities from the last Rome Studio Program (Summer 2013).  They provide students’ perspective on the events of each day.  Be sure to click the date in bold for each entry.  It will take you to a PDF of the entry with pictures and images.

June 19 & 20th

The Rome Studio program concluded all scheduled activities on June 19th.  Students had individual meetings during the day with the faculty: Matt Ziff, Vincent Caranchini, and Joey Behrens (Program Assistant) where they reviewed their projects and progress during the program.

When not in meetings, students had time to run final errands, pack and get gifts for family and friends in anticipation of departure the following day.

A Sicilian Farewell Dinner happened at a local restaurant near the American University of Rome at 7pm.  The group had the pleasure of a delicious several course meal, which included the best pistachio gelato in town (according to many of the students afterwards).  The group was joined by the local staff from ISA (International Studies Abroad), including Andrea, Vera, Anna and Rosanna.  Many stories and laughs were exchanged between the staff, faculty and students as they recapped the time together in Rome.

On June 20th students departed for home and the Rome Studio 2013 officially ended.

Please check back to this blog in a few days, as the faculty will be posting some observations and photos about the individual students who participated in the Rome Studio.

 

June 18th

The EUR was planned in 1942 when Mussolini wanted it built for a world’s fair in celebration of his totalitarian regime. His regime ended in 1943 and he was executed 2 years later. Nearly a half a century later, Italians still are questioning what to do with the space. Some projected selling if off to private buyers, but that never followed through. There is still a debate in whether the restoration should be done to preserve Mussolini’s favored designs.

For complete details and photos see: June 18th

Post by Austin Boraten & Caitlyn Rudolph

June 17th

Summer has OFFICIALLY hit in Rome. This summer weather brings heat and humidity so sweltering; even the students who’ve experienced Athens’ summers are melting. On this particular morning (Monday June 17th), I found it hard to sleep since the morning high of 82 degrees F was rolling in the window quicker than I wanted. Our morning was already starting off rather sluggish after all of us had the previous day off, the heat and our impending walk to the AUR (American University of Rome) was making us weary for the day.

For complete details and photos see: June 17th

Post by Lauren Funk & Molly Waggoner

June 15th

Waking up in Assisi to an amazing view was fantastic. The 7:30am bells from the Duomo di Rufino were chiming for us to wake up and head to breakfast even though we actually had an extra hour to sleep. After heading to the main hotel building to grab some caffeine and carbs to help us rejuvenate for the day, we had an hour or two to ourselves before we met to return back to Rome. Some went off in search of last minute souvenirs and others went to find a good place to draw. I personally went out to find stronger caffeine and a view to admire before leaving the small town on top of the hill. The contrast between Assisi and Rome is unbelievable. Trading out sirens for bird’s chirping was definitely nice for a change.

For complete details and photos see: June 15th

Post by Helen Reed & Jordan Hibner

June 14th

The town of Foligno was setting up for their annual medieval festival when we arrived. It was a small town but had great shopping and restaurants. Apart from the noises from the festival preparation, Foligno felt like a ghost town.  We walked far outside the town to a residential area where, beside a small school, the church of San Paolo stood. The church was a massive concrete block that looked out of place among the apartment buildings and gravel lots.

For complete details and photos see: June 14th

Post by Rachelle Roberts & Taylor Welch

June 13th

After settling in for a little at our hotel with an amazing view, we set off as a group down to the Basilica of Saint Francis. This church was built in the honor of the Saint Francis of Assisi where he was born and died. It is said to be the mother church of the Franciscan order. This very distinctive landmark of Assisi is probably the first thing you notice when approaching this hill top town. Today it is called “the hill of paradise”. It is a huge three part building including the original lower church, built in 1228, the upper church which was build on in 1239, and the crypt under the lower church which houses St. Francis’s tomb. Inside the church was an amazing sight!

For complete details with photos see: June 13th

Post by Alex Brewer & Reilly Englehart

June 12th

Zaha Hadid is a woman greatly admired by most of the Interior Architecture students in the Ohio University program. As most of us are females, seeing another woman’s creative energy successfully built is an aweinspiring sight for our young eyes. It was a compelling morning for everyone where we found not enough time to absorb every exhibit and immerse ourselves in every architectural element inside and out of the museum. Visiting a major institute in the contemporary design world significantly impacted each one of our design perspectives and ideas. The MAXXI is the polar opposite compared to the ancient ruins that we have been focusing on in Italy. The architectural contrast visually shows a progression that must be appreciated when wanting to partake in modern design. As a group, we are learning to understand the built environment through an evolution.

For complete details and pictures see: June 12th

Post by Angela Starosta & Alex McDonald